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Version 1
21. April 2016.
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21. April, 2016

Urban water safety plan template for Bhutan

21. April, 2016

Provides a template WSP for urban water supply system in Bhutan based on the WSP manual. Contains text and tables as examples, which should be reviewed and revised to reflect system-specific conditions.

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2012

WSP training package

by WHO, 2012

The training package consists of three components, a facilitator handbook, a participant workbook and accompanying PowerPoint presentations. It is structured around 13 learning modules based on the WHO/IWA WSP Manual: Step by step risk management for drinking-water supplies and the WHO/IWA WSP Quality Assurance Tool.

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 11. April, 2013

WSP quality assurance tool

by WHO, 11. April, 2013

Tool developed to support the development and implementation of WSPs, systematically highlighting the areas where progress is being made and opportunities for improvement.

Version 2
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 1997

Guidelines for Drinking-Water Quality (2nd Ed. Volume 3 – Surveillance and control of community supplies

by WHO, 1997

This publication describes the methods used in the surveillance of drinking-water quality in the light of the special problems of small-community supplies, particularly in developing countries, and outlines the strategies necessary to ensure that surveillance is effective. It is also concerned with the linkage between surveillance and remedial action and with the form that remedial action should take.

Version 4
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2011

Guidelines for drinking-water quality (4th Ed. incorporating the first addendum) – ENGLISH

by WHO, 2011

The Guidelines for drinking-water quality is an authoritative basis for the setting of national regulations and standards for water safety in support of public health. It provides guidance on ways of implementing its recommendations of contextual hazard identification and risk management, including catchment-to-consumer water safety plans. The Guidelines position WSPs as a core element of the Framework for Safe Drinking-water and outline the principles and key elements of a WSP for policy-makers.

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2010

Think big, start small, scale-up: a road map to support country level implementation of water safety plans – ENGLISH

by WHO, 2010

This document provides a 'road map' to support country-level implementation of WSPs. It provides guidance for country planners on how to initiate and carry out WSP implementation.  The document outlines a series of steps which may guide how WSP implementation and scale-up of WSPs may be approached at a national level.

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2014

Water safety plan: a field guide to improving drinking-water safety in small communities – ENGLISH

by WHO, 2014

This field guide provides a step-by-step introduction to the WSP approach and a range of ready-to-use templates to assist those locally involved in rural water supply to develop and implement their own WSPs.
The field guide particularly addresses the rural community members responsible for the operation and management of their water supplies, as well as the staff of the local health and water supply offices responsible for safeguarding drinking-water quality and nongovernmental organizations that support drinking-water safety in rural communities.

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2012

Water safety planning for small community water supplies – ENGLISH

by WHO, 2012

This manual is designed to engage, empower and guide communities in the WSP development and implementation process. Guidance is provided on how to develop and implement a WSP through six achievable tasks. By following the WSP approach as described in this manual, small communities can improve the management of their drinking-water systems to achieve incremental and sustainable improvements in their drinking-water quality.

Version 3
21. April 2016.
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by WHO et al., 2009

Water safety plan manual

by WHO et al., 2009

Water safety plans (WSPs) are the most effective means of consistently ensuring the safety of a drinking water supply. This WSP manual describes how to develop and implement a WSP in clear and practical terms. Stepwise advice is provided through 11 learning modules, each representing a key step in the WSP development and implementation process.

Version 2
21. April 2016.
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by IWA, 2007

Development and implementation of water safety plans for small scale supplies in Bangladesh: benefits and lessons learned

by IWA, 2007

This paper presents a case study from Bangladesh describing how WSPs can be developed and implemented for small systems. Model WSPs were developed through consultation with key water sector practitioners in the country. Simplified tools were developed to translate the formal WSPs into a format that was meaningful and accessible for communities to use.

Version 2
10. November 2015.
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by WHO et al., 10. November, 2015

A practical guide to auditing Water Safety Plans

by WHO et al., 10. November, 2015

This document provides guidance on developing and implementing a WSP auditing scheme, covering such topics as the aim and role of auditing, auditor training and certification, audit criteria, audit timing and frequency and audit reporting. The guidance document includes examples, tips, tools and case studies, and it serves as a practical resource for policy makers, government bodies responsible for drinking-water regulation or surveillance and water suppliers implementing WSPs.

Version 1
20. March 2014.
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by World Health Organization, 03. March, 2014

Water safety in distribution systems

by World Health Organization, 03. March, 2014

Water quality deterioration in distribution systems, mainly caused by inappropriate planning, design and construction or inadequate operation and maintenance and water quality control, has been linked to a significant proportion of the burden of waterborne and water-related illness. Stresses on these systems caused by rapid urbanization, population growth and aging infrastructure further exacerbates the problems. This reference tool has been developed to help water suppliers and regulators who are familiar with the Water Safety Plan approach, enhance their risk assessment and management and investment planning for their water distribution systems.

Version 1
5. March 2014.
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by EPA , 05. March, 2014

Climate Ready Water Utilities

by EPA , 05. March, 2014

Climate change is important to consider in all aspects of utility operations and planning because it can impact both the water resources as well as the infrastructure necessary to provide clean and safe water. The Climate Ready Water Utilities initiative is a practical and easy to use tool developed by EPA to assists the drinking water, waste water and stormwater utilities in understanding and addressing climate change risks and impacts as well as preparing operators systems’ for the impacts of climate change.

Version 2
1. October 2013.
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by WHO, 01. October, 2013

Maynilad Water: Water Safety Plans

by WHO, 01. October, 2013

Describes the formulation of a Water Safety Plan by Maynilad Water Services, Inc. Philippines.

Version 1
20. March 2013.
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by WHO et al., 04. March, 2013

Water safety plan quality assurance tool

by WHO et al., 04. March, 2013

This tool is designed to guide organized drinking-water supplies through a WSP self-assessment to determine the WSP’s completeness and the effectiveness of its implementation. It aims to support the development, implementation and assessment of WSPs by systematically highlighting the areas where progress is being made and opportunities for improvement.

Version 1
1. April 2012.
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by Unathi Jack and Philip de Souza , 01. April, 2012

Guidelines for using Web-Enabled Water Safety Plan Tool

by Unathi Jack and Philip de Souza , 01. April, 2012

The Water Research Commission (WRC) project K5/1993//3 “Web enablement of a water safety plan and incorporation of existing similar supply system assessment tool” aimed to establish a methodology to identify and manage the risks of water services infrastructure and the means by which Water Services Institutions (WSIs) are better able to identify and manage these through use of Water Safety Planning. The tool assists in developing a Water Safety Plan. Implementation thereof (e.g. taking required actions, implementing corrective actions, developing and implementing management and communication procedures) of the Water Safety Plan depends on the Water Services Institution (WSI).

Version 1
1. November 2011.
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by World Health Organization et al., 01. November, 2011

Vietnam: Water safety plan

by World Health Organization et al., 01. November, 2011

Under AusAid funding, WHO supported WSP implementation in Vietnam. This case study highlights key WSP facts, and describes the water supply situation and regulation of WSP in Vietnam

Version 1
1. November 2011.
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by DASS-NC Service santé environnement , 01. November, 2011

Plans de Sécurité Sanitaire des Eaux de consommation (PSSE) Etudes de cas en Nouvelle-Calédonie

by DASS-NC Service santé environnement , 01. November, 2011

French version. This document describes the WSP implementation process in New Caledonia (French territory in the Pacific Ocean) for 13 municipalities that started in 2008. It describes the risk assessment and management tools used, the benefits achieved, the challenges and solutions to those challenges and the overall lessons learned.

Version 1
1. November 2011.
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by World Health Organization et al., 01. November, 2011

Philippines: Water safety plan

by World Health Organization et al., 01. November, 2011

Under AusAid funding, WHO supported WSP implementation in the Philippines. This case study reports on key WSP facts, and describes the status of water supply in the Philippines

Version 1
1. November 2011.
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by World Health Organization et al., 01. November, 2011

Nepal: Water safety plan

by World Health Organization et al., 01. November, 2011

Under AusAid funding, WHO supported Water safety plan implementation in Nepal. This case study reports on key WSP facts, and describes the status of water supply.

Version 1
1. November 2011.
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by DASS-NC Service santé environnement , 01. November, 2011

Implementation of WSP New Caledonia

by DASS-NC Service santé environnement , 01. November, 2011

This document describes the WSP implementation process in New Caledonia (French territory in the Pacific Ocean) for 13 municipalities that started in 2008. It describes the risk assessment and management tools used, the benefits achieved, the challenges and solutions to those challenges and the overall lessons learned.

Version 1
1. November 2011.
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by World Health Organization et al., 01. November, 2011

Bhutan: Water safety plan

by World Health Organization et al., 01. November, 2011

Under AusAid funding, WHO supported WSP implementation in Bhutan. This case study reports on key facts of the WSPs, and describes the status of water supply in Bhutan.

Version 2
1. November 2011.
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by Enviromental Health Control Section et al., 01. November, 2011

Water Safety Plan Handbook: for rural water supply systems

by Enviromental Health Control Section et al., 01. November, 2011

Provides customized guidance on implementing WSPs in rural water supply systems tailored to the Malaysian context

Version 1
4. July 2011.
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by WHO , 04. July, 2011

Bangladesh: Water safety plan

by WHO , 04. July, 2011

Under AusAid funding, WHO supported WSP implementation in 10 urban systems in Bangladesh. This case study reports on WSP facts, and provides a description of the status of urban and rural water supply in Bangladesh.

Version 1
1. April 2011.
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by Gef et al., 01. April, 2011

Technologies for Climate Change Adaptation

by Gef et al., 01. April, 2011

This guidebook, released by UNEP Risoe Center, describes adaptation strategies in the categories of water conservation; storm water control and capture; resilience to water quality degradation; preparation for extreme weather events; diversification of water supply; and mitigation. It has been made widely available and will help both developed and developing countries understand means of increasing resilience to the uncertain effects of future climate change. The Water Institute at UNC provided technical and methodological expertise.

Version 1
20. March 2011.
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by World Health Organization, 07. March, 2011

Water safety in buildings

by World Health Organization, 07. March, 2011

Provides guidance for those responsible for managing water supply systems in buildings on applying the WSP approach to improve risk management and ensure water safety is maintained within the building.

This document provides guidance for managing water supplies in buildings where people may drink water; use water for food preparation; wash, shower, swim or use water for other recreational activities; or be exposed to aerosols produced by water-using devices, such as cooling towers. These uses occur in a variety of buildings, such as hospitals, schools, child and aged care, medical and dental facilities, hotels, apartment blocks, sport centres, commercial buildings and transport terminals.

Version 1
1. February 2011.
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by Frank Greaves and Claire Simmons , 01. February, 2011

Water Safety Plans for communities: guidance for adoption of water safety plans at community level

by Frank Greaves and Claire Simmons , 01. February, 2011

Numerous publications now exist on the formation and use of WSPs, but most of these focus on largerscale projects run by private or public utilities, commercial enterprises and international NGOs. Tearfund’s particular interest is in how WSPs can be understood and established by user communities which are faced with self-managing a water supply project to gain sustainable access to safe water quality. The guide is written chiefly for the use of a facilitator or facilitating body (eg the hygiene promoters or community mobilisers of a DMT or partner staff) to use in training community members, and in particular,the water project accountability group (eg Water Users Committee) of the community.

Version 1
1. February 2011.
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by CDC, 01. February, 2011

A Conceptual Framework to Evaluate the Impacts of Water Safety Plans

by CDC, 01. February, 2011

This paper outlines a conceptual framework for conducting this type of overall evaluation of the impacts of a WSP. Drawing examples from existing WSPs in various regions, the framework also illustrates the types of intermediate outcomes that can be expected during WSP implementation. This conceptual framework, which requires some familiarity with WSPs, is designed to be one of a set of tools to guide the implementation and evaluation of Water Safety Plans, along with the WHO guidelines (WHO, 2006), the Water Safety Plan Manual (Bartram et al, 2009) and other tools and resources developed for national or regional use1

Version 1
2. January 2011.
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by Engeeners Without Borders Australia , 02. January, 2011

SNAKES & LADDERS – Water Safety Plan version in Nepal

by Engeeners Without Borders Australia , 02. January, 2011

‘WSP Snakes & Ladders’ was developed according to the hazards identified and hazard control measures developed for this particular community in Nepal. The game could easily be adapted to any drinking water system or community, ensuring that the hazards and control measures are locally appropriate.

Version 2
1. November 2010.
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by Federica Gerber et al., 01. November, 2010

An Economic Assessment of Drinking Water Safety PlanningKoror-Airai, Palau

by Federica Gerber et al., 01. November, 2010

This document describes a preliminary economic assessment of the Koror-Airai, Palau drinking water safety plan. The information generated is to be used to inform stakeholders in Palau of the rewards from supporting the DWSP approach, demonstrating the potential benefits of investing in the Plan.

Version 1
24. September 2010.
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by Talem Hasan and Federica Gerber , 24. September, 2010

The Economics of Drinking Water Safety Planning: An Advocacy Tool

by Talem Hasan and Federica Gerber , 24. September, 2010

This paper describes an economic cost-benefit analysis of the Koror-Airai drinking water safety plan from Palau to demonstrate the value to society of the drinking water safety planning approach in the long term. The cost-benefit analysis for implementing the Koror-Airai drinking water safety plan showed that a return of US$ 6.00 was expected on every US$ 1.00 invested towards implementing the plan. The case study provides an effective advocacy tool for the promotion of drinking water safety planning both in the Pacific region and globally.

Version 2
24. September 2010.
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by Talem Hasan and Federica Gerber , 24. September, 2010

Economics of WSP: an advocacy tool

by Talem Hasan and Federica Gerber , 24. September, 2010

This paper describes an economic cost-benefit analysis of the Koror-Airai drinking water safety plan from Palau to demonstrate the value to society of the drinking water safety planning approach in the long term. The cost-benefit analysis for implementing the Koror-Airai drinking water safety plan showed that a return of US$ 6.00 was expected on every US$ 1.00 invested towards implementing the plan. The case study provides an effective advocacy tool for the promotion of drinking water safety planning both in the Pacific region and globally.

Version 2
8. June 2010.
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by Asian Development Bank et al., 08. June, 2010

WOPs Manila and Danang on Water quality improvement

by Asian Development Bank et al., 08. June, 2010

Da Nang Water Supply Company (DAWACO) and Manila Water Company, Inc. (Manila Water) engaged in a water operator partnership (WOP) to help DAWACO meet World Health Organization (WHO) standards for water quality in their pipe network. Through the partnership, 20,000 residents received improved access to water, and DAWACO increased staff capacity to scale up similar improvements in the remainder of DAWACO’s service area.

Version 1
22. March 2010.
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by AusAID and SOPAC , 22. March, 2010

Drinking Water Safety Planning: A practical guide for the Pacific Island countries

by AusAID and SOPAC , 22. March, 2010

This document is a guideline for development and implementation of Water Safety Plans approach in the Pacific. It is primarily for water supply managers, engineers and operators and introduces a more proactive way of managing drinking water supplies through a comprehensive risk assessment and risk management approach. Implementing DWSPs helps achieve a more effective drinking water supply system.

Version 1
20. March 2010.
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by WHO, 01. March, 2010

Water safety plans: managing drinking-water quality for public health

by WHO, 01. March, 2010

A brief note on the rationale for the WSP approach, the potential benefits for various stakeholder groups, and the value of incorporating WSPs into policies and regulations.

Version 2
1. November 2009.
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by USEPA et al., 01. November, 2009

Water Quality application of composite correction in India

by USEPA et al., 01. November, 2009

This case study describes the study of the Composite Correction Programme (CCP) in three different cities in India to prepare for the implementation of Water Safety Plans. CCP is a water treatment plant optimization program that improves water treatment operation with limited capital investment by optimizing particle removal from water treatment plants.

Version 2
28. September 2009.
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by MWH , 28. September, 2009

Consumer Acceptability Data Case Study: Yarra Valley Water, Australia

by MWH , 28. September, 2009

This case study provides an example of a water supplier in Australia which has undertaken research to understand consumer expectations in relation to water quality. This includes the use of surveys and focus groups. It also describes the approach the company takes to handling, recording, and reviewing complaints.

Version 2
28. September 2009.
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by MWH , 28. September, 2009

Consumer Acceptability Data Case Study: Lyonnaise des Eaux, France

by MWH , 28. September, 2009

This case study provides an example of where a water supplier in France has established a system to collect consumer acceptability data via a group of volunteers. It provides one particular approach to the collection of opinions on the taste and odour of water supplied.

Version 2
28. September 2009.
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by MWH , 28. September, 2009

Consumer Acceptability Case Study: Dunedin City Council, New Zealand

by MWH , 28. September, 2009

This case study provides an example of where a water supplier in New Zealand operates a Service Centre to respond quickly to customer complaints and assesses levels of consumer acceptability through analysis of complaint data and questionnaires.

Version 1
1. September 2009.
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by Department of health Victoria et al., 2011

Case Study on Water Safety Plan Implementation and Lessons Learned: WSP auditing Victoria Australia

by Department of health Victoria et al., 2011

This case study describes the implementation of WSP and lessons learned in Victoria Australia. This case study has a specific focus on auditing WSPS.