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Version 1
20. March 2014.
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by World Health Organization, 03. March, 2014

Water safety in distribution systems

by World Health Organization, 03. March, 2014

Water quality deterioration in distribution systems, mainly caused by inappropriate planning, design and construction or inadequate operation and maintenance and water quality control, has been linked to a significant proportion of the burden of waterborne and water-related illness. Stresses on these systems caused by rapid urbanization, population growth and aging infrastructure further exacerbates the problems. This reference tool has been developed to help water suppliers and regulators who are familiar with the Water Safety Plan approach, enhance their risk assessment and management and investment planning for their water distribution systems.

Version 1
29. June 2018.
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1 comment
by WHO EURO, 29. June, 2018

Water safety plans in the European region: Promotional video

by WHO EURO, 29. June, 2018

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2FkFK3Kgbo[/embed]

Small-scale systems are an important component of water supply in the WHO European Region, and Water Safety Plans (WSPs) are regarded the most effective approach to ensuring continuous provision of safe drinking-water.

The above is a short promotional video on WSPs in the WHO European Region.

Version 2
1. August 2009.
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by Bob Breach , 01. August, 2009

Microbial regrowth and disinfection in the network

by Bob Breach , 01. August, 2009

This document summarizes the management of risk from microbial regrowth in distribution systems through optimized chlorine disinfection. Considerations is also given to the potential for formation of disinfection by-products. Strategies for controlling these risks are presented.

Version 2
1. August 2009.
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by Bob Breach , 01. August, 2009

Backsiphonage into the distribution network

by Bob Breach , 01. August, 2009

This document sets out information which allows water suppliers and others to work together to minimise the risk of backsiophange (that is, the reverse flow condition created by a difference in water pressures that causes water and associated contaminants to flow back into drinking-water distribution pipes).

Version 1
1. November 2011.
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by DASS-NC Service santé environnement , 01. November, 2011

Implementation of WSP New Caledonia

by DASS-NC Service santé environnement , 01. November, 2011

This document describes the WSP implementation process in New Caledonia (French territory in the Pacific Ocean) for 13 municipalities that started in 2008. It describes the risk assessment and management tools used, the benefits achieved, the challenges and solutions to those challenges and the overall lessons learned.

Version 1
3. August 2009.
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by Mathias H. Kleppen , 03. August, 2009

Pacific Drinking Water Safety Planning Lessons Learned

by Mathias H. Kleppen , 03. August, 2009

This case study provides the progress and lessons learned form the implementation of the Pacific Drinking Water Safety Plan programme.

Version 2
1. October 2007.
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by WSP, 01. October, 2007

Spanish Town, Jamaica Case Study

by WSP, 01. October, 2007

Presents the WSP for Spanish Town, Jamaica, which may provide an example approach for WSP development for WSP community at an early stage of WSP development

Version 1
20. March 2006.
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by World Health Organization, 2006

Protecting groundwater for health: managing the quality of drinking-water sources

by World Health Organization, 2006

Provides guidance for health, environment and water sector professionals on the application of risk management approaches to protect groundwater sources of drinking-water, presenting a structured approach to analyzing hazards to groundwater quality, assessing and prioritizing the risks they pose, and developing management strategies for their control.

Version 2
28. September 2009.
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by MWH , 28. September, 2009

Consumer Acceptability Case Study: Dunedin City Council, New Zealand

by MWH , 28. September, 2009

This case study provides an example of where a water supplier in New Zealand operates a Service Centre to respond quickly to customer complaints and assesses levels of consumer acceptability through analysis of complaint data and questionnaires.

Version 1
26. July 2018.
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by Government of Nepal et al., 02. October, 2017

Climate Resilient Water Safety Plans Guideline: Urban Water Supply System

by Government of Nepal et al., 02. October, 2017

These guidelines have been developed to support urban water supply schemes in Nepal to development and implement climate resilient WSPs.

Version 1
1. September 2007.
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by Enviromental and Engineering Managers Ltd. , 01. September, 2007

Lessons learned from development WSP in Jamaica

by Enviromental and Engineering Managers Ltd. , 01. September, 2007

This document is a technical paper following the "Spanish town Jamaica Case study". It describes the lessons learned from the development of the Water Safety Plan for the Spanish town water supply system in Jamaica.

Version 1
26. July 2018.
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by Government of Nepal et al., 02. October, 2017

Climate Resilient Water Safety Plans Guideline: Rural Water Supply System

by Government of Nepal et al., 02. October, 2017

Based on international best practice and Nepal's Department of Water Supply & Sanitation experiences, these guidelines have been developed to support rural water supply schemes to development and implement an effective climate resilient WSP in rural settings.

 

Version 1
1. December 2008.
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by Bob Breach , 01. December, 2008

Rapid gravity filters-water quality benefits and risks

by Bob Breach , 01. December, 2008

Rapid gravity filters are used extensively in many waterworks across the world where they provide a critical part of the water purification process. This document summarises the basic functions and operation of such filters and identifies possible risks to water quality which need to be assessed and managed as part of a treatment water safety plan.

Version 2
1. August 2009.
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by Bob Breach , 01. August, 2009

Treated water storage

by Bob Breach , 01. August, 2009

This document summarises the type of risks that might occur within treated water storages and how to control them.

Version 1
1. April 2011.
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by Gef et al., 01. April, 2011

Technologies for Climate Change Adaptation

by Gef et al., 01. April, 2011

This guidebook, released by UNEP Risoe Center, describes adaptation strategies in the categories of water conservation; storm water control and capture; resilience to water quality degradation; preparation for extreme weather events; diversification of water supply; and mitigation. It has been made widely available and will help both developed and developing countries understand means of increasing resilience to the uncertain effects of future climate change. The Water Institute at UNC provided technical and methodological expertise.

Version 1
20. March 2011.
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by World Health Organization, 07. March, 2011

Water safety in buildings

by World Health Organization, 07. March, 2011

Provides guidance for those responsible for managing water supply systems in buildings on applying the WSP approach to improve risk management and ensure water safety is maintained within the building.

This document provides guidance for managing water supplies in buildings where people may drink water; use water for food preparation; wash, shower, swim or use water for other recreational activities; or be exposed to aerosols produced by water-using devices, such as cooling towers. These uses occur in a variety of buildings, such as hospitals, schools, child and aged care, medical and dental facilities, hotels, apartment blocks, sport centres, commercial buildings and transport terminals.

Version 1
1. August 2009.
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by Bob Breach , 01. August, 2009

Unauthorised access to the network

by Bob Breach , 01. August, 2009

It is the experience of many water suppliers that illegal or unauthorised access to the distribution network can occur for a variety of reasons. This poses a number of water quality risks and can also create wider problems related to loss of revenue. This document briefly summarises the water quality risks associated with unauthorised access and how they can be mitigated.

Version 1
11. September 2017.
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by WHO, 11. September, 2017

Directives de qualité pour l’eau de boisson: Quatrième édition intégrant le premier additif

by WHO, 11. September, 2017

La quatrième édition des Lignes directrices de l'OMS pour la qualité de l'eau potable s'appuie sur plus de 50 ans d'orientations sur la qualité de l'eau potable qui font autorité en matière de mesures de santé publique lorsqu’il s’agit de mettre en place des réglementations et des normes nationales pour garantir la sécurité de l'eau.

C'est le produit de révisions significatives pour clarifier les recommandations et apporter des moyens de les mettre en œuvre en sachant identifier les dangers, gérer les risques en adoptant des indicateurs sanitaires, des plans de sécurité des eaux de captation et un système de surveillance indépendant.

Le premier addendum met à jour cette quatrième édition, apporte de nouveaux éléments de preuve et des explications supplémentaires pour mieux comprendre les directives et les mettre en œuvre.

Ces lignes directrices s’adressent principalement aux responsables de la réglementation dans le domaine de l’eau et de la santé, aux décideurs et à leurs conseillers, et ont pour objectif d’aider lors de la mise au point de normes nationales. Elles sont aussi utilisées, ainsi que les documents associés, par comme source d’informations sur la qualité et l’hygiène de l’eau et sur les stratégies de gestion efficaces.

Version 1
11. September 2017.
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by WHO, 11. September, 2017

Руководство по обеспечению качества питьевой воды, четвертое издание

by WHO, 11. September, 2017

В настоящее издание Руководства по обеспечению качества питьевой воды включено опубликованное в 2004 году третье издание, а также первое дополнение к третьему изданию, опубликованное в 2006 году, и второе дополнение к третьему изданию, опубликованное в 2008 году. Настоящее издание заменяет собой предыдущие издания Руководства и Международные стандарты.

В этом издании Руководства далее развиваются концепции, подходы и информация, содержащиеся в предыдущих изданиях, и в том числе впервые изложенный в третьем издании комплексный подход к профилактическому управлению риском в целях обеспечения качества питьевой воды.

Данное Руководство адресовано в первую очередь регулирующим органам систем водоснабжения и здравоохранения, директивным органам и их консультантам в целях оказания помощи в разработке национальных стандартов. Руководство и связанные с ним документы также используются многими другими в качестве источника информации по вопросам обеспечения качества воды и охраны здоровья, а также по эффективным подходам к управлению.

Version 1
11. May 2016.
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by WHO/IWA, 2010

Être ambitieux, s’engager prudemment, puis élargir le champ d’action

by WHO/IWA, 2010

Dans le cadre des efforts continus en faveur de la sécurité sanitaire de l’eau de boisson et de la santé, de nombreux pays ont demandé des orientations concernant la façon d’introduire des plans de gestion de la sécurité sanitaire de l’eau (PGSSE) et d’élargir leur mise en oeuvre. Il n’existe ni modèle ni façon unique de procéder en la matière.
Néanmoins, en se fondant sur l’expérience, une succession d’étapes décrivant comment y parvenir a été définie. Cette « feuille de route » relative aux PGSSE est destinée aux gouvernements et aux autorités chargés de concevoir ou de réviser les réglementations, programmes, et politiques relatifs à l’eau de boisson. Elle peut également se révéler utile pour les distributeurs d’eau et les autres organisations intéressées par l’amélioration des pratiques existantes.

Version 1
1. February 2011.
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by CDC, 01. February, 2011

A Conceptual Framework to Evaluate the Impacts of Water Safety Plans

by CDC, 01. February, 2011

This paper outlines a conceptual framework for conducting this type of overall evaluation of the impacts of a WSP. Drawing examples from existing WSPs in various regions, the framework also illustrates the types of intermediate outcomes that can be expected during WSP implementation. This conceptual framework, which requires some familiarity with WSPs, is designed to be one of a set of tools to guide the implementation and evaluation of Water Safety Plans, along with the WHO guidelines (WHO, 2006), the Water Safety Plan Manual (Bartram et al, 2009) and other tools and resources developed for national or regional use1

Version 2
1. August 2009.
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by Bob Breach , 01. August, 2009

Corrosion and mains sediments

by Bob Breach , 01. August, 2009

This document summarises the drinking-water quality risks associated with corrosion and sediment accumulation within distribution networks and describes ways that the risks can be mitigated.

Version 1
1. November 2008.
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by Bob Breach , 01. November, 2008

WSP summary of benefits and costs

by Bob Breach , 01. November, 2008

Before implementation of a WSP it is important to clearly identify the expected benefits and the associated costs both of which could be significant. This will help secure the support of senior management, ensure that sufficient resources are made available and allow much more targeted and efficient implementation. The actual benefits and costs of WSP implementation will vary considerably from utility to utility. This document sets out a summary of the issues that need to be taken into account.

Version 1
2. March 2008.
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by US Department of Health and Human Services et al., 02. March, 2008

A guide to conducting household surveys for Water Safety Plans

by US Department of Health and Human Services et al., 02. March, 2008

The aim of this manual is to provide guidance on conducting a household survey as part of a Water Safety Plan for organized piped water supply systems in resource-limited settings. A household survey can help researchers to understand the fate of water from the time it reaches the home to the point of consumption. This survey contributes to Module 2 (System Assessment) of the Water Safety Plan, upon which the subsequent steps of hazard identification, consideration of control measures, and development of corrective actions, monitoring, and verification plans are based. Thus, the survey provides valuable information for the WSP team as the team goes through the process of system evaluation and implementation of changes resulting from the Water Safety Plan. Specific examples intended to guide the planner in designing the survey are provided in the appendices. A summary checklist for survey planning and completion is provided as Appendix A.

Version 1
16. May 2019.
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01. May, 2019

Strategic Recommendations for Climate Smart Water Utilities: Using the Flood and Drought Portal in Planning

01. May, 2019

The effect of climate change on the hydrological cycle is becoming a growing phenomenon and resulting in impacts including flood and drought events, disappearance of glaciers, decrease in groundwater recharge, and water quality degradation (e.g. oxygen depletion in water reservoirs during extreme heat events) (WHO, 2017).

Such events are becoming increasingly common, more severe and less predictable with increasing climate variability and change. Stakeholders from catchment to tap have a role to play in strengthening climate resilience. Water utilities, in particular, need to have sustainable and resilient water resources management to ensure water supply continuity and to fulfill their responsibility to deliver safe and secure water to their customers.

This document focuses on strategic recommendations for water utilities on:

  1. Why and how water utilities can integrate climate change impacts into planning and management of water resources, specifically through WSPs; and
  2. How to use the Flood and Drought Portal (www.flooddroughtmonitor.com), to better include climate data and information into WSP, ensuring its climate resilience