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Version 3
21. April 2016.
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by WHO et al., 2009

Water safety plan manual

by WHO et al., 2009

Water safety plans (WSPs) are the most effective means of consistently ensuring the safety of a drinking water supply. This WSP manual describes how to develop and implement a WSP in clear and practical terms. Stepwise advice is provided through 11 learning modules, each representing a key step in the WSP development and implementation process.

Version 0
16. November 2016.
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by Luca Lucentini et al., 15. November, 2016

Checklist for auditing a drinking water treatment plant

by Luca Lucentini et al., 15. November, 2016

This checklist is conceived as an on-site, concise tool to support the Egyptian Water Regulatory Agency (EWRA) inspectors in performing a comprehensive audit of drinking water treatment plants. It covers both management and technical aspects of service provision in assuring adequate level of performance for health and environmental protection. The list is composed of 8 sections, encompassing:
- identification and service data
- local (outside) circumstances and security issues
- organization, human resources, procedures and training
- workplace safety, environmental and equipment conditions
- operations and maintenance
- power supply and ancillary services
- drinking water network
- laboratory, reporting and monitoring data

Version 1
13. December 2017.
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by WHO, 13. December, 2017

Water safety planning: A roadmap to supporting resources

by WHO, 13. December, 2017
Describes resources developed by the World Health Organization (WHO), and partners, on various aspects of water safety planning, such as water safety plan development, implementation, training, advocacy and auditing.
Version 1
22. March 2019.
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by WHO, 22. March, 2019

A guide to equitable water safety planning: Ensuring no one is left behind

by WHO, 22. March, 2019

The lack of access to safe drinking-water is felt disproportionately by those who are disadvantaged socially, economically, demographically or geographically, and explicit consideration of these groups is required to understand and address disparities.

This document describes how, with relatively modest efforts, the water safety plan (WSP) approach can bring tangible improvements in water quality and availability for all users. By providing step-by-step guidance for all WSP stakeholders, as well as good practice examples from a broad range of countries and contexts, this document serves as a practical tool to help achieve safe water for all.

The electronic version of the PowerPoint slides presented in Tool F of the document, available under “Downloads” above, is intended to facilitate the integration of equity considerations into standard WSP training events.

Version 3
18. December 2017.
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by WHO, 2016

Risk Matrix – Example of Semi-Quantitative Matrix

by WHO, 2016

Example of a semi-quantitative risk matrix to classify the severity and likelihood of identified hazards and hazardous events.

Version 1
16. May 2018.
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1 comment
by Rory Moses McKeown, 16. May, 2018

Water safety plan template including climate considerations for rural water supplies: United Rep. of Tanzania

by Rory Moses McKeown, 16. May, 2018

This water safety plan (WSP) template was developed to support the integration of climate risks into the WSP approach in rural areas of the United Rep. of Tanzania. Examples are presented on how to complete the template, and the information should be considered and customized to the local context.

This template is  based on WHO EURO (2014) Water safety plan: a field guide to improving drinking-water safety in small communities, but adapted to the local context.

This resource was developed as part of the Department for International Development (DFID, UK)-funded project on “Building adaptation to climate change in health in least developed countries through resilient WASH” which was implemented from 2013-2018 in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Nepal and Tanzania.

Version 1
24. August 2016.
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by WHO, 2010

Иметь большие планы, начинать с малого, расширять масштабы Дорожная карта для оказания поддержки в реализации на уровне стран планов обеспечения безопасности воды

by WHO, 2010

Предпринимая постоянные усилия по повышению безопасности питьевой воды и улучшению здоровья населения, многие страны запросили методические рекомендации о том, как внедрить и расширить масштабы реализации планов обеспечения безопасности воды (ПОБВ). Какой-то одной модели или одного способа, который можно было бы применить для того, чтобы приступить к реализации ПОБВ и затем расширить ее масштабы, нет. Однако накопленный опыт позволяет обозначить ряд шагов, или этапов, которые показывают, как это можно сделать.

Предлагаемая “Дорожная карта” для реализации ПОБВ предназначена для органов государственного управления и нормативного регулирования, которые отвечают за пересмотр действующих или разработку новых стратегий, программ и нормативов в области питьевого водоснабжения. Она также может оказаться полезной для негосударственных организаций, финансирующих учреждений и других структур, заинтересованных в улучшении имеющихся у них программ и практики работы.

Version 1
25. May 2016.
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by Dani J. Barrington et al.,

How to prepare Water Safety Plans for community managed water supply systems in rural Nepal – ENGLISH

by Dani J. Barrington et al.,

This package contains tools and resources for developing water safety plans (they could be considered "WaSH Safety Plans") in rural communities where the water and sanitation is managed by the community themself.

Whilst it was developed for Nepal, these tools may be applicable for community managed systems around the globe.

Version 1
6. December 2016.
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by Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technologies, 01. August, 2016

Technical Brief: Water Safety Plans and Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage

by Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technologies, 01. August, 2016

This Technical Brief, written by CAWST (Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technologies), integrates both approaches and introduces the importance of water safety planning for small communities. It describes the benefits of including household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) in a water safety plan, and explains how the WSP approach can improve HWTS implementation.

It also provides an overview of the six water safety planning tasks for small communities, with considerations for integrating HWTS throughout the tasks.

Version 4
24. August 2016.
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by WHO, 2011

Guidelines for drinking-water quality (4th Ed.) – JAPANESE

by WHO, 2011

The Guidelines for drinking-water quality is an authoritative basis for the setting of national regulations and standards for water safety in support of public health. It provides guidance on ways of implementing its recommendations of contextual hazard identification and risk management, including catchment-to-consumer water safety plans.

Version 1
18. January 2018.
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by WHO, 18. January, 2018

Guide pratique pour l’audit des plans de gestion de la sécurité sanitaire de l’eau

by WHO, 18. January, 2018

Ce guide vise à aider à l’élaboration et à la mise en œuvre de programmes d’audit des plans de gestion de la sécurité sanitaire de l’eau dédiés en définissant les principes et exigences les plus  importants. C’est une ressource pratique à l’intention des décideurs politiques, des organismes chargés de la réglementation ou de la surveillance de l’eau potable, des distributeurs d’eau mettant en œuvre des plans de gestion de la sécurité, et tous autres professionnels du secteur s’intéressant à la question de l’audit de ces plans.

Version 1
16. November 2016.
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by Rory Moses McKeown, 16. November, 2016

WSP template for rural water supplies in Ghana

by Rory Moses McKeown, 16. November, 2016

This WSP template as been developed and customized specifically for use in rural water supplies in Ghana. Text in yellow provides an example of how to complete each section. This template may be considered for use in other countries and regions, but must first be reviewed and adapted to suit the local context.

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2012

WSP training package

by WHO, 2012

The training package consists of three components, a facilitator handbook, a participant workbook and accompanying PowerPoint presentations. It is structured around 13 learning modules based on the WHO/IWA WSP Manual: Step by step risk management for drinking-water supplies and the WHO/IWA WSP Quality Assurance Tool.

Version 1
11. May 2016.
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by WHO/IWA, 2009

Руководство по разработке и реализации плана обеспечения безопасности воды

by WHO/IWA, 2009

В 2004 г. в опубликованном ВОЗ "Руководстве по обеспечению качества питьевой воды" поставщикам было рекомендовано разработать и осуществить планы обеспечения безопасности воды, чтобы можно было систематически оценивать риски и управлять ими. С того времени правительства и регулирующие органы, поставщики воды и практические работники все шире принимают на вооружение этот подход, однако ими была высказана просьба о дополнительных методических руководствах.

Данное руководство по разработке и реализации плана обеспечения безопасности воды является ответом на эту просьбу. В нем понятным языком описывается, как практически нужно разрабатывать и реализовывать такой план. В 11 учебных модулях даются пошаговые рекомендации, причем каждый модуль представляет собой один ключевой шаг в процессе разработки и реализации плана обеспечения безопасности воды.

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2014

Water safety plan: a field guide to improving drinking-water safety in small communities – ENGLISH

by WHO, 2014

This field guide provides a step-by-step introduction to the WSP approach and a range of ready-to-use templates to assist those locally involved in rural water supply to develop and implement their own WSPs.
The field guide particularly addresses the rural community members responsible for the operation and management of their water supplies, as well as the staff of the local health and water supply offices responsible for safeguarding drinking-water quality and nongovernmental organizations that support drinking-water safety in rural communities.

Version 1
4. November 2016.
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by South-East Asia Regional Office of WHO , 27. April, 2016

Capacity Training on Urban Water Safety Planning – Training Modules

by South-East Asia Regional Office of WHO , 27. April, 2016

These training materials have been developed by the South-East Asia Regional Office of WHO to be used either to train trainers or to train operators of water supply utilities or sector stakeholders. They are intended for use by governments, NGOs, private sector, academic institutions and individuals. They may be used intensively over three or five days or included in longer educational programs either as part of academic courses or as part of continuing professional development training. They comprise:
- Presenters Guide,
- Participant’s Handbook,
- PowerPoint slides notes for presenter and PowerPoint Handouts for participants,
- Worksheets and other resources for participants
- Table group worksheets for use during the training programme.

 

Version 1
29. September 2017.
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by Water Supplies Department et al., 21. September, 2017

Guidelines for Drinking Water Safety Plans for Buildings in Hong Kong

by Water Supplies Department et al., 21. September, 2017

根據世界衛生組織(WHO)的建議,香港水務署最近編制了建築物水安全計劃的指引和範本,協助業主或物業管理代理制訂水安全計劃,以風險為本和多重障礙的方法,加強建築物的食水安全。建築物水安全計劃的實施,有賴物業管理和水喉業界人士的共同努力,包括辨識和評估內部供水系統的潛在風險,制定控制措施和執行相應的檢查和保養。此外,通過定期審核和檢視,物業管理可以驗證和更新建築物的水安全計劃。香港水務署已於2017年9月推出建築物水安全計劃的指引和分別合適一般建築物和學校使用的範本後,供建築物業主或物業管理代理自願參與。

Based on the recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Water Supplies Department (WSD) of Hong Kong has recently developed guidelines and templates for Water Safety Plan (WSP) for Buildings. The guidelines and templates aim at assisting building owners or management agents to develop their own WSPs to enhance water safety in buildings by using a risk-based and multiple barrier approach. Implementation of WSP for buildings requires concerted efforts of building management and plumbing practitioners, including identifying and assessing potential risks of the inside service, deriving control measures and carrying out the corresponding checking and maintenance. In addition, the WSP will be verified and updated by the building management through periodic auditing and review. The guidelines and templates for general buildings and schools have been launched in September 2017 for voluntary adoption by building owners or management agents.

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2012

Water safety planning for small community water supplies – ENGLISH

by WHO, 2012

This manual is designed to engage, empower and guide communities in the WSP development and implementation process. Guidance is provided on how to develop and implement a WSP through six achievable tasks. By following the WSP approach as described in this manual, small communities can improve the management of their drinking-water systems to achieve incremental and sustainable improvements in their drinking-water quality.

Version 1
28. February 2017.
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by Ministry of Water Irrigation and Energy Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, 01. July, 2015

CLIMATE RESILIENT WATER SAFETY PLAN IMPLEMENTATION – Guidelines for Urban Utility Managed Drinking Water Supplies

by Ministry of Water Irrigation and Energy Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, 01. July, 2015

The purpose of these Ethiopian guidelines is to provide step-by-step guidance to the operators and managers of the large, medium and small urban water supplies with conventional water treatment systems on how to develop, implement, monitor, and review the water safety plans aimed at protecting human health. Furthermore, it serves as practical tool in identifying and addressing priority risks to the water quality and quantity, reliability and sustainability of the water supply system  including risks related to current and future impacts of climate changes by taking into consideration available resources and capacities of the water supply system.

Version 1
26. July 2018.
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by Government of Nepal et al., 02. October, 2017

Training Package on Climate Resilient Water Safety Plan (CR-WSP)

by Government of Nepal et al., 02. October, 2017

This training toolkit aims to support  roll-out of climate resilient WSPs in Nepal by capacitating national trainers. The training materials are based on international (WHO) and national (Department of Water Supply & Sanitation) best practices and experiences.

The training toolkit contains a “Facilitators handbook”, “Participants workbook” and presentations, to support the successful and consistent delivery of the national climate resilient WSP training program.

Version 1
13. April 2018.
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by Water Supplies Department et al., 02. April, 2018

Water safety plan template for residential care homes for the elderly

by Water Supplies Department et al., 02. April, 2018

This template is prepared based on recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO)  to assist the owner or the house management staff of a residential care home for the elderly with an independent internal plumbing system to develop and implement a Water Safety Plan (WSP) to enhance water safety.

Version 1
11. August 2017.
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by Giuliana Ferrero et al., 17. July, 2017

A role-playing game for practising stakeholder collaboration in Water Safety Plans

by Giuliana Ferrero et al., 17. July, 2017

One of the challenges in the implementation of Water Safety Plans (WSPs) is stakeholder engagement. For this reason, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education has developed a role-playing game for practising stakeholder collaboration in WSP. The game can be used in WSP training or during educational activities for water safety and WSP at graduate and post-graduate level. Its goal is for participants to experience the importance of stakeholder engagement in WSPs, and particularly in the decision-making process when investing in the rehabilitation and maintenance of a drinking water supply system from catchment to consumers. Participants will experience how this process can be influenced by information exchange between stakeholders and how this will eventually lead to greater awareness when assembling the WSP team.

Version 1
22. March 2019.
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by Arnt Diener / WHO EURO, 22. March, 2019

Documentary on WSP implementation

by Arnt Diener / WHO EURO, 22. March, 2019

Beautiful short film on how to achieve safe drinking-water by Björn Weber, Oliver Meinborn and Grimme-price winner Ute Hilgeford. Launched by the World Health Organization on World Water Day 2019.

The film-makers accompany a community in the mountains of Tajikistan – where water safety plans have been introduced for the first time in Central Asia. It is a group of citizens who take matters into their own hands. An inspiring story of how a village invests their funeral fund on safer drinking-water.

Version 1
18. September 2018.
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by WHO et al., 18. September, 2018

Strengthening operations & maintenance through water safety planning: A collection of case studies

by WHO et al., 18. September, 2018

This document presents case studies from lower and higher income settings around the world that highlight O&M benefits resulting from WSP implementation. These case studies contribute to a growing body of information on the outcomes of water safety planning and may be useful in building support for WSPs among water sector senior managers, operational staff and other stakeholders.

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2010

Think big, start small, scale-up: a road map to support country level implementation of water safety plans – ENGLISH

by WHO, 2010

This document provides a 'road map' to support country-level implementation of WSPs. It provides guidance for country planners on how to initiate and carry out WSP implementation.  The document outlines a series of steps which may guide how WSP implementation and scale-up of WSPs may be approached at a national level.

Version 1
2. May 2018.
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by Giuliana Ferrero et al., 23. February, 2018

Experiential Learning through Role-Playing: Enhancing Stakeholder Collaboration in Water Safety Plans

by Giuliana Ferrero et al., 23. February, 2018

Improved water safety management, as addressed by the Sustainable Development Goals, can be aided by Water Safety Planning, a risk-assessment and risk-management approach introduced
by the World Health Organization and implemented to date in 93 countries around the globe. Yet, this approach still encounters some challenges in practice, including that of securing collaboration among the broad range of stakeholders involved. This paper presents a role-playing game designed to foster stakeholder collaboration in Water Safety Plans (WSP). In this role-play, participants take on different stakeholders’ roles during a collective (team-based) decision-making process to improve water supply safety in a fictive town. The game is the result of a transdisciplinary initiative aimed at integrating knowledge across technical and governance aspects of WSPs into an active learning experience for water sector actors from diverse backgrounds. It exposes participants to the four phases of Kolb’s experiential learning cycle: concrete experience, reflective observation, conceptualization and active experimentation. This paper discusses potential impacts of the WSP role-play, including skills and knowledge development among participants, which can support cross-sectoral integration and dealing with complexity in decision-making. These are capacity assets strongly needed to address water safety management challenges in a sustainable way.

Version 0
24. May 2018.
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by Karen E. Setty et al., 03. April, 2018

Time series study of weather, water quality, and acute gastroenteritis at Water Safety Plan implementation sites in France and Spain

by Karen E. Setty et al., 03. April, 2018

Water Safety Plans (WSPs), recommended by the World Health Organization since 2004, can help drinking water suppliers to proactively identify potential risks and implement preventive barriers that improve safety. Few studies have investigated long-term impacts of WSPs, such as changes in drinking water quality or public health; however, some evidence from high-income countries associates WSP implementation with a reduction in diarrheal
disease. To validate the previously observed linkages between WSPs and health outcomes, this time series
study examined site-specific relationships between water-related exposures and acute gastroenteritis rates at three locations in France and Spain, including the role of WSP status. Relationships between control or exposure variables and health outcomes were tested using Poisson regression within generalized additive models. Controls included suspected temporal trends in disease reporting. Exposures included temperature, precipitation, raw water quality, and finished water quality (e.g., turbidity, free chlorine). In France, daily acute gastroenteritis cases were tracked using prescription reimbursements; Spanish data aggregated monthly acute gastroenteritis hospital visits. The models identified several significant relationships between indicators of exposure and acute gastroenteritis. Lag times of 6–9 days (including transit time) were most relevant for hydrological indicators (related to precipitation, runoff, and flow) at the two French sites, indicative of viral pathogens. Flush events (defined as surface runoff after a two-week antecedent dry period) linked to nonpoint source pollution were associated with a 10% increase in acute gastroenteritis rates at one location supplied by surface water. Acute gastroenteritis rates were positively associated with elevated turbidity average or maximum values in finished water at locations supplied by both surface and groundwater, by about 4% per 1-NTU increase in the two-week moving average of daily maxima or about 10% per 0.1 NTU increase in the prior month’s average value. In some
cases, risk appeared to be mitigated by WSP-related treatment interventions. Our results suggest drinking water exposure is associated with some potentially preventable gastrointestinal illness risk in high-income regions.

Version 1
4. December 2017.
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by World Health Organization (Regional Office for South-East Asia), 17. July, 2017

Principles and Practices of Drinking-water Chlorination: A guide to strengthening chlorination practices in small- to medium-sized water supplies

by World Health Organization (Regional Office for South-East Asia), 17. July, 2017

Practical guidance and training materials for small- and medium-sized water supplies, and for those providing training and support to these suppliers, on strengthening chlorination practices – a common improvement need identified through the WSP process in the South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions. Training materials include a facilitator’s guide and PowerPoint slides, and basic standard operating procedures and calculation sheets for effective and safe chlorination. The materials are based on training programmes delivered in the regions.

Version 1
1. July 2019.
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by Water Supplies Department et al., 01. July, 2019

WSP template for hospitals in Hong Kong

by Water Supplies Department et al., 01. July, 2019

This template is prepared based on recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO) with an aim to assisting the management staff of a hospital to develop and implement Water Safety Plan (WSP) to enhance water safety. It covers the essential elements of WSPs and common requirements applicable to the plumbing layout of hospitals. In additional to the English version, this resource is also available in traditional Chinese and simplified Chinese.

 

 

Version 1
6. December 2018.
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by Rickert B et al., 30. November, 2018

Climate Resilient Water Safety Plans (CR-WSP). Compilation of potential hazardous events and their causes

by Rickert B et al., 30. November, 2018

Climate-resilient water safety plans (CR-WSPs) extend the traditional WSP framework by also identifying and managing climate-related impacts on water supply systems to strengthen resilience. This compilation of information on hazardous events and their causes, including those related to climate impacts, aims to support practitioners, particularly water suppliers, health agencies and consultants, in implementing CR-WSPs. It is not intended to be an exhaustive list, and may need to be adapted for application in the local context.

Version 1
24. August 2016.
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by WHO, 2014

План обеспечения безопасности воды: практическое руководство по повышению безопасности питьевой воды в небольших местных общинах

by WHO, 2014

Снабжение приемлемой и безопасной питьевой водой в достаточном количестве является одной из основных необходимых предпосылок хорошего здоровья, экономического развития и устойчивой жизнедеятельности семей в сельских сообществах. Подход с использованием плана безопасности воды (ПБВ) является наиболее эффективным путем обеспечения питьевой водой в условиях маломасштабных систем водоснабжения.

В данных рекомендациях приводятся поэтапное описание подхода ПБВ и целый ряд готовых к использованию схем в помощь тем, кто занимается вопросами сельского водоснабжения на местном уровне, в разработке и осуществлении своих собственных ПБВ.

Рекомендации прежде всего адресованы членам сельских сообществ, отвечающих за организацию работы и управление системами водоснабжения, а также сотрудникам местных органов здравоохранения и водоснабжения, ответственных за обеспечение качества питьевой воды, и неправительственным организациям, оказывающим поддержку в области обеспечения безопасности питьевой воды в сельской местности.

Version 1
20. March 2017.
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by World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe et al.,

Taking policy action to improve small-scale water supply and sanitation systems. Tools and good practices from the pan-European Region

by World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe et al.,

Presents policy-makers with a range of regulatory, planning, financial and educational instruments to support effective policy and promote good practice (including water safety planning) to improve small-scale water supply and sanitation systems.

This publication aims to inspire practitioners and policy-makers who develop water supply and sanitation policies and programmes at the national or subnational levels to consider improvement actions that they can adapt for their own circumstances. It further assists policy-makers in formulating specific targets for small-scale systems and in planning concrete actions for their achievement. Other stakeholders – such as aid and funding agencies, local governments and nongovernmental organizations – may also find the information relevant for their programmes and projects.

Version 1
10. February 2017.
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by MOWIE Ethiopia, 18. October, 2016

Climate Change and Health – Ethiopia – Lesson learned documentation WASH sector

by MOWIE Ethiopia, 18. October, 2016

The purpose of this document is to share Ethiopia’s experience in the implementation of the "Building adaptation to climate change in health in least developed countries through WASH project" especially the WASH sector with development partners, government bodies and project implementing member countries. It includes valuable lessons learned from development and implementation of climate-resilient water safety plans and associated policy.

 

 

Version 1
6. February 2019.
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by Moeller et al., 2009

Developing Water Safety Plans Involving Schools – Introducing “Water Safety Plans” for small-scale water supply systems – Manual for teachers and pupils

by Moeller et al., 2009

The World Health Organisation (WHO) initiated the Water Safety Plans (WSP), which is to be considered as a part of the WHO or other guidelines or directives on drinking water quality. The WSP asks for an identification of risks, which could affect water safety and human health in every stage of the water supply. It is also necessary, however, to identify measures, which minimise and manage the risks have to be identified. A WSP should be discussed, developed and implemented with involvement of all stakeholders. The paper give an introduction into this important issue.

Version 0
17. October 2018.
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by Karen Setty et al., 01. September, 2018

Assessing operational performance benefits of a Water Safety Plan implemented in Southwestern France

by Karen Setty et al., 01. September, 2018

Aims: The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended Water Safety Plans (WSPs)
since 2004 as a means to reduce drinking water contamination and risks to human health.
These risk management programs have shown promise across several potential areas of
evaluation, such as economic benefits and regulatory compliance. Since WSPs are largely
carried out by people who interact with water treatment equipment and processes, operational
performance indicators may be key to understanding the mechanisms behind desirable WSP
impacts such as water quality and public health improvement.
Method: This study reports performance measures collected at a WSP implementation
location in southwestern France over several years.
Results: Quantitative assessment of performance measures supported qualitative reports from
utility managers. Results indicate significantly reduced duration of low-chlorine events at one
production facility and a significant decrease in customer complaints related to water quality,
manifesting reported improvements in operational performance and the customer service
culture.
Conclusion: The findings demonstrate some success stories and potential areas of future
performance tracking. Cyclical iteration of the WSP can help to achieve continuous quality
improvement. Successfully applied evaluation criteria such as the number of water quality
complaints or alarm resolution time might be useful across other locations.

Version 1
9. November 2016.
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by Paul M Byleveld et al.,

Safe drinking water in regional NSW, Australia

by Paul M Byleveld et al.,

The New South Wales (NSW) Public Health Act 2010 requires water suppliers to implement a drinking water quality assurance program that addresses the ‘Framework for management of drinking water quality’ in the Australian drinking water guidelines. NSW Health has recognised the importance of a staged implementation of this requirement and the need to support regional water utilities. To date, NSW Health has assisted 74 regional utilities to develop and implement their management systems. The Public Health Act 2010 has increased awareness of drinking water risk management, and offers a systematic process to identify and control risks. This has benefited large utilities, smaller suppliers, and remote and Aboriginal communities. Work is continuing to ensure implementation of the process by private suppliers and water carters.

Version 1
8. August 2017.
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by EPA Ireland, 08. February, 2011

Developing drinking water safety plans

by EPA Ireland, 08. February, 2011

This document provides guidance to water suppliers on the steps involved in developing a water safety plan and an outline of what it should contain in the Irish context. It contains guidance and useful templates on hazard identification, risk assessment and the preparation of action plans for the hazards identified.

Version 1
10. June 2019.
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by Bettina Rickert et al., 13. May, 2019

Including aspects of climate change into water safety planning: Literature review of global experience and case studies from Ethiopian urban supplies

by Bettina Rickert et al., 13. May, 2019

In recent years, the water safety plan approach has been extended towards climate-resilient water safety planning. This happened in response to increasing insight into impacts of climate on drinking-water and required adaptation to anticipated climate change. Literature was reviewed for published guidance and case examples, documenting how to consider climate in water safety planning to support future uptake. Climate-resilient water safety plans were piloted within a project in the water supplies of Addis Ababa and Adama, Ethiopia.

Case examples have been published in four of six WHO regions with a focus on urban supplies. Integration of climate aspects focused mostly on the steps of establishing the team, system description, hazard analysis and risk assessment, improvement planning and development of management procedures. While the traditional framework focuses on drinking-water quality, considering climate change augments aspects of water quantity. Therefore, other factors affecting water quantity such as population development and demand of other sectors need to be considered as well. Local climate information and tools should be employed as a significant success factor for future uptake. Such information should be incorporated as it becomes available, and may – depending on the setting – be incrementally integrated into existing water safety plans or used to develop new ones.

Version 1
27. June 2018.
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by Emily Kumpel et al., 10. June, 2018

Measuring the Impacts of Water Safety Plans in the Asia-Pacific Region

by Emily Kumpel et al., 10. June, 2018

This study investigated the effectiveness of Water Safety Plans (WSP) implemented in 99 water supply systems across 12 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. An impact assessment methodology including 36 indicators was developed based on a conceptual framework proposed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and before/after data were collected between November 2014 and June 2016. WSPs were associated with infrastructure improvements at the vast majority (82) of participating sites and to increased financial support at 37 sites. In addition, significant changes were observed in operations and management practices, number of water safety-related meetings, unaccounted-for water, water quality testing activities, and monitoring of consumer satisfaction. However, the study also revealed challenges in the implementation of WSPs, including financial constraints and insufficient capacity. Finally, this study provided an opportunity to test the impact assessment methodology itself, and a series of recommendations are made to improve the approach (indicators, study design, data collection methods) for evaluating WSPs.

Version 1
18. October 2017.
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by WHO, 18. October, 2017

Climate-resilient water safety plans: Managing health risks associated with climate variability and change

by WHO, 18. October, 2017

This document provides guidance on how climate considerations can be integrated into water safety planning to provide greater resilience to the current and predicted impacts of climate change and variability on water supplies. The guidance is supported by numerous practical examples of climate resilient water safety planning from both low and high income settings.