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Version 1
19. May 2016.
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by Angella Rinehold, 25. August, 2016

Rural WSP template for Cambodia

by Angella Rinehold, 25. August, 2016

This resource provides a template for a WSP for a rural community in Cambodia which has been customized and tailored to the local context through a pilot programme.
Important note - This template should be adapted and trialed before being used in a different context.

Version 1
8. November 2016.
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by World Health Organization (Editors: Rickert B et al.,

Protecting surface water for health: Editable checklists and tables to support catchment inspection

by World Health Organization (Editors: Rickert B et al.,

Protecting surface water for health provides a structured approach to understanding surface waters and their catchments to support the identification, assessment and prioritization of the risks, and the development of management strategies for their control, as a basis for providing safe drinking-water.

Editable versions of the catchment and pollution assessment checklists and inventory tables that are presented in the book to support surface-water catchment inspection are presented here. Please refer to the introductory pages of Section 3.2 of Protecting surface water for health for guidance on how to use these checklists and tables to perform a catchment assessment (http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/publications/pswh/en/).

Version 4
24. August 2016.
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by WHO, 2011

Guidelines for drinking-water quality (4th Ed.) – CHINESE

by WHO, 2011

The Guidelines for drinking-water quality is an authoritative basis for the setting of national regulations and standards for water safety in support of public health. It provides guidance on ways of implementing its recommendations of contextual hazard identification and risk management, including catchment-to-consumer water safety plans.

Version 2
29. July 2016.
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by WHO, 29. July, 2013

WSP implementation and lessons learned: Amarapuri Water Supply

by WHO, 29. July, 2013

This case study describes the benefits, challenges, and lessons learned from WSP implementation in the Amarapuri Water Supply System, Nepal.

Version 4
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2011

Guidelines for drinking-water quality (4th Ed. incorporating the first addendum) – ENGLISH

by WHO, 2011

The Guidelines for drinking-water quality is an authoritative basis for the setting of national regulations and standards for water safety in support of public health. It provides guidance on ways of implementing its recommendations of contextual hazard identification and risk management, including catchment-to-consumer water safety plans. The Guidelines position WSPs as a core element of the Framework for Safe Drinking-water and outline the principles and key elements of a WSP for policy-makers.

Version 1
1. April 2012.
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by Unathi Jack and Philip de Souza , 01. April, 2012

Guidelines for using Web-Enabled Water Safety Plan Tool

by Unathi Jack and Philip de Souza , 01. April, 2012

The Water Research Commission (WRC) project K5/1993//3 “Web enablement of a water safety plan and incorporation of existing similar supply system assessment tool” aimed to establish a methodology to identify and manage the risks of water services infrastructure and the means by which Water Services Institutions (WSIs) are better able to identify and manage these through use of Water Safety Planning. The tool assists in developing a Water Safety Plan. Implementation thereof (e.g. taking required actions, implementing corrective actions, developing and implementing management and communication procedures) of the Water Safety Plan depends on the Water Services Institution (WSI).

Version 2
11. July 2017.
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by Karen Setty et al., 19. February, 2017

Water quality, compliance, and health outcomes among utilities implementing Water Safety Plans in France and Spain

by Karen Setty et al., 19. February, 2017

Water Safety Plans (WSPs), recommended by the World Health Organization since 2004, seek to proactively identify potential risks to drinking water supplies and implement preventive barriers that improve safety. To evaluate the outcomes of WSP application in large drinking water systems in France and Spain, we undertook analysis of water quality and compliance indicators between 2003 and 2015, in conjunction with an observational retrospective cohort study of acute gastroenteritis incidence, before and after WSPs were implemented at five locations. Measured water quality indicators included bacteria (E. coli, fecal streptococci, total coliform, heterotrophic plate count), disinfectants (residual free and total chlorine), disinfection by-products (trihalomethanes, bromate), aluminum, pH, turbidity, and total organic carbon, comprising about 240K manual samples and 1.2M automated sensor readings. We used multiple, Poisson, or Tobit regression models to evaluate water quality before and after the WSP intervention. The compliance assessment analyzed exceedances of regulated, recommended, or operational water quality thresholds using chi-squared or Fisher’s exact tests. Poisson regression was used to examine acute gastroenteritis incidence rates in WSP-affected drinking water service areas relative to a comparison area. Implementation of a WSP generally resulted in unchanged or improved water quality, while compliance improved at most locations. Evidence for reduced acute gastroenteritis incidence following WSP implementation was found at only one of the three locations examined. Outcomes of WSPs should be expected to vary across large water utilities in developed nations, as the intervention itself is adapted to the needs of each location. The approach may translate to diverse water quality, compliance, and health outcomes.
(Final report at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheh.2017.02.004)

Version 1
21. February 2017.
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by Oliver Schmoll et al., 01. June, 2014

Das Water-Safety-Plan-Konzept: Ein Handbuch für kleine Wasserversorgungen (The WSP concept: a manual for small water supplies)

by Oliver Schmoll et al., 01. June, 2014

The German Environment Agency and the Water Technology Centre published a manual for implementation of the WSP approach in small-scale water supplies in Germany in 2014, which complements the technical rule on WSPs of the German Technical and Scientific Association for Gas and Water (DVGW) with practical explanations, recommendations, examples and supporting tools.

Version 1
1. August 2009.
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by Peter Thompson and Sameera Majam , 01. August, 2009

The development of a generic Water Safety Plan for small community water supply

by Peter Thompson and Sameera Majam , 01. August, 2009

This case study describes the development of Water Safety Plans in small community water supplies in South Africa. It describes the previous assessment methods as well as the eleven steps taken to develop and implement the WSP.

Version 1
1. October 2008.
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by WHO - Western Pacific Region , 01. October, 2008

Training workbook on Water Safety Planning Urban systems

by WHO - Western Pacific Region , 01. October, 2008

The objective of this workbook is to serve as a guide to facilitate WSP development for an organised water supply that is managed by a water utility or similar entity. WSPs can be tailored differently for each specific water supply system. This workbook is generic and is not specific to any particular country. It is anticipated that trainers in each country would develop their own WSP training material which would be linked directly to country drinking water standards and implementing guidelines as well as bring written in other appropriate languages.

Version 1
28. February 2017.
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by Ministry of Water Irrigation and Energy Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, 01. July, 2015

CLIMATE RESILIENT WATER SAFETY PLAN IMPLEMENTATION – Guidelines for Community Managed Rural Drinking Water Supplies

by Ministry of Water Irrigation and Energy Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, 01. July, 2015

The purpose of these Ethiopian guidelines is to provide step-by-step guidance to the rural community/board managed water supplies on how to develop, implement, monitor, and review the rural community managed water safety plans aimed at protecting human health. Furthermore, it serves as a practical tool in identifying and addressing priority risks to the water quality and quantity, reliability and sustainability of the rural water supply system including risks related to current and future impacts of climate changes by taking into consideration available resources and capacities of the water supply system.

Version 1
1. August 2009.
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by Peter Thompson and Sameera Majam , 01. August, 2009

South Africa The development of a generic water safety plan for small community water supply

by Peter Thompson and Sameera Majam , 01. August, 2009

This document describes development of a Water Safety Plan with a background focus on Africa.

Version 1
21. June 2017.
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by World Health Organization, 13. June, 2017

Global status report on water safety plans: A review of proactive risk assessment and risk management practices to ensure the safety of drinking-water

by World Health Organization, 13. June, 2017

Based on information gathered from 118 countries representing every region of the globe, this report provides a picture of WSP uptake worldwide. It presents information on WSP implementation and the integration of WSPs into the policy environment. It also explores WSP benefits, challenges and future priorities.

It is envisaged that this report will serve as a useful resource for policy-makers, practitioners and other stakeholders to inform and strengthen the planning and practice of WSP implementation.

Version 1
18. October 2017.
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by Roger Singleton, 01. July, 2017

Drinking Water Safety and Security Planning Template

by Roger Singleton, 01. July, 2017

A community focused WSP template to support drinking water safety and security planning in Fiji. This template is designed to make risk assessment easier for community WSP implementation.

Version 1
22. March 2019.
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by WHO, 22. March, 2019

A guide to equitable water safety planning: Ensuring no one is left behind

by WHO, 22. March, 2019

The lack of access to safe drinking-water is felt disproportionately by those who are disadvantaged socially, economically, demographically or geographically, and explicit consideration of these groups is required to understand and address disparities.

This document describes how, with relatively modest efforts, the water safety plan (WSP) approach can bring tangible improvements in water quality and availability for all users. By providing step-by-step guidance for all WSP stakeholders, as well as good practice examples from a broad range of countries and contexts, this document serves as a practical tool to help achieve safe water for all.

The electronic version of the PowerPoint slides presented in Tool F of the document, available under “Downloads” above, is intended to facilitate the integration of equity considerations into standard WSP training events.

Version 1
19. July 2016.
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by Nguyen Lanh et al., 19. July, 2016

GUIDELINES ON WATER SAFETY INVESTMENT PLAN (WSIP) FOR APPLICATION IN IMPLEMENTATION OF WATER SAFETY PLAN PHASE 3 IN VIETNAM

by Nguyen Lanh et al., 19. July, 2016

Water supply companies may face challenges when developing an investment plan for implementation of WSPs, due to the relatively large number of objectives with limited available budget for funding. This draft publication aims to provide guidance for water service companies to develop an investment plan that can meet the most of basic requirements of a WSP in a most cost-effective manner.
This draft publication is currently under review, and we would welcome your feedback to WSPortal@iwahq.org.

Version 1
3. January 2017.
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by Ahmad Montazeri, 13. September, 2015

Development and implementation of water safety plans in Iran

by Ahmad Montazeri, 13. September, 2015

This presentation describes the development and implementation of WSP in Tabriz in Iran under the guidance of the World Health Organization Regional Office.

Version 001
18. October 2017.
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by Mahmoud Abd Al Rahman Saad Mehany et al., 01. May, 2017

Water Safety Plan for Edfina Drinking Water Supply System, Behira Governorate – Egypt

by Mahmoud Abd Al Rahman Saad Mehany et al., 01. May, 2017

Edfina Drinking Water Treatment Plant was installed at Behira governorate, Egypt in 1998 and, due to increasing of water demand, the water authority intends to increase its capacity by installing a new conventional water treatment plant. However, water resources are suffering from many illegal activities in the catchment which deteriorate the raw water quality. The water higher community took the decision to develop a  WSP for Edfina supply system with the Holding Company in coordination with other water stakeholders (including the Irrigation ministry, Environmental ministry, Health Minisry, NGOs....). This document is the first version of the WSP and is shared as an example of a WSP approach adopted in Egypt.

Version 1
2. November 2016.
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by J.F. Loret et al., 01. October, 2016

Assessing the costs and benefits of Water Safety Plans

by J.F. Loret et al., 01. October, 2016

A survey was conducted to assess the costs and benefits of the WSPs developed at 197 production units operated by the SUEZ Company and serving a total of 10.6 million consumers in France, Spain, Cuba, Morocco and Macao. The results demonstrate benefits in terms of confidence of clients and health agencies. The main benefits however consist of a better control of hazards, especially new hazards that were previously overlooked, and of the treatments steps which are deemed as the most important for water safety. As the progress achieved is essentially linked with unregulated contaminants, improvements in compliance rate were rarely observed after implementation of WSPs. It is supposed that better control of these hazards, together with improved process control, result in improved safety for the consumers.

Version 1
26. July 2018.
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by Federal Ministry of Water et al., 01. July, 2015

Climate Resilient Water Safety Strategic Framework Ethiopia

by Federal Ministry of Water et al., 01. July, 2015

This framework provides the strategic blueprint to develop a climate orientated risk assessment and management approach for drinking-water supplies, from catchment to consumer.

Considered global best practice, WHO advocates for the WSP approach as the most consistent means to ensure the safe and reliable supply of safe drinking-water. Adapted to the Ethiopian context, this document outlines a roadmap for the national scale-up of climate resilient WSPs.

Version 1
1. November 2011.
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by World Health Organization et al., 01. November, 2011

Nepal: Water safety plan

by World Health Organization et al., 01. November, 2011

Under AusAid funding, WHO supported Water safety plan implementation in Nepal. This case study reports on key WSP facts, and describes the status of water supply.

Version 1
7. June 2016.
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by Luca Rondi et al., 14. August, 2015

Sustainability of Water Safety Plans Developed in Sub-Saharan Africa

by Luca Rondi et al., 14. August, 2015

The WSP approach was elaborated within two cooperation projects implemented in rural areas of Burkina Faso and Senegal by two Italian NGOs (Non-Governmental Organisations). In order to evaluate its sustainability, a questionnaire based on five different sustainability elements and a cost and time consumption evaluation were carried out and applied in both the case studies. Results demonstrated that the questionnaire can provide a useful and interesting overview regarding the sustainability of the WSP; however, further surveys in the field are recommended for gathering more information. Time and costs related to the WSP elaboration, implementation, and management were demonstrated not to be negligible and above all strongly dependent on water quality and the water supply system complexity.

Version 1
25. May 2016.
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by Dani J. Barrington et al.,

How to prepare Water Safety Plans for community-managed water supply systems in rural Nepal – Nepali

by Dani J. Barrington et al.,

This package has been developed for WaSH practitioners seeking to develop water (probably more correctly, WaSH) safety plans with rural communities who manage their own water and sanitation systems. Although the overall guide is in English, all of the resources to be used with the community are in Nepali.

Version 1
17. May 2016.
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by Maria J. Gunnarsdottir et al., 07. June, 2012

Benefits of Water Safety Plans: Microbiology, Compliance, and Public Health

by Maria J. Gunnarsdottir et al., 07. June, 2012

The article describes an Icelandic study to determine the impact of WSP implementation on regulatory compliance, microbiological water quality, and incidence of clinical cases of diarrhea.

Version 2
10. November 2015.
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by WHO et al., 10. November, 2015

A practical guide to auditing Water Safety Plans

by WHO et al., 10. November, 2015

This document provides guidance on developing and implementing a WSP auditing scheme, covering such topics as the aim and role of auditing, auditor training and certification, audit criteria, audit timing and frequency and audit reporting. The guidance document includes examples, tips, tools and case studies, and it serves as a practical resource for policy makers, government bodies responsible for drinking-water regulation or surveillance and water suppliers implementing WSPs.

Version 1
6. February 2019.
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by Moeller et al., 2009

Developing Water Safety Plans Involving Schools – Introducing “Water Safety Plans” for small-scale water supply systems – Manual for teachers and pupils

by Moeller et al., 2009

The World Health Organisation (WHO) initiated the Water Safety Plans (WSP), which is to be considered as a part of the WHO or other guidelines or directives on drinking water quality. The WSP asks for an identification of risks, which could affect water safety and human health in every stage of the water supply. It is also necessary, however, to identify measures, which minimise and manage the risks have to be identified. A WSP should be discussed, developed and implemented with involvement of all stakeholders. The paper give an introduction into this important issue.

Version 1
30. June 2017.
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by Hallvard Ødegaard et al., 30. June, 2014

Microbial barrier analysis (MBA) – a guideline

by Hallvard Ødegaard et al., 30. June, 2014

In order to safeguard the public against waterborne diseases, water utilities must secure that multiple, microbial barriers are provided for in their drinking water systems. In most water utilities disinfection of the water represents an important barrier, but microbial barriers may also be achieved by other actions, for example in the catchment area.

Based on experiences from Norway, Sweden and Finland, this guideline is a helpful tool for implementing Water Safety Plans. The guideline explains the "barrier concept" and assist water utilities as well as their their consultants in determining what actions to take to ensure that the microbial barriers in their systems are sufficient – and that the water is safe to drink.

Version 1
8. August 2017.
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by EPA Ireland, 08. February, 2011

Developing drinking water safety plans

by EPA Ireland, 08. February, 2011

This document provides guidance to water suppliers on the steps involved in developing a water safety plan and an outline of what it should contain in the Irish context. It contains guidance and useful templates on hazard identification, risk assessment and the preparation of action plans for the hazards identified.

Version 1
22. June 2017.
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by ADB et al., 31. May, 2017

Water safety planning for urban water utilities: Practical guide for ADB staff

by ADB et al., 31. May, 2017

This handbook provides practical guidance on integrating the water safety plan (WSP) approach into ADB's urban water projects to facilitate compliance with global good practices. Following the WHO’s Water Safety Plan Manual (2009), adapted to ADB’s operations, this handbook offers step-by-step guidance on developing and implementing a WSP, serving as an example of how external support agencies may integrate WSPs into their urban water programmes.

Version 1
18. October 2017.
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by WHO, 18. October, 2017

Climate-resilient water safety plans: Managing health risks associated with climate variability and change

by WHO, 18. October, 2017

This document provides guidance on how climate considerations can be integrated into water safety planning to provide greater resilience to the current and predicted impacts of climate change and variability on water supplies. The guidance is supported by numerous practical examples of climate resilient water safety planning from both low and high income settings.

Version 0
17. October 2018.
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by Karen Setty et al., 01. September, 2018

Assessing operational performance benefits of a Water Safety Plan implemented in Southwestern France

by Karen Setty et al., 01. September, 2018

Aims: The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended Water Safety Plans (WSPs)
since 2004 as a means to reduce drinking water contamination and risks to human health.
These risk management programs have shown promise across several potential areas of
evaluation, such as economic benefits and regulatory compliance. Since WSPs are largely
carried out by people who interact with water treatment equipment and processes, operational
performance indicators may be key to understanding the mechanisms behind desirable WSP
impacts such as water quality and public health improvement.
Method: This study reports performance measures collected at a WSP implementation
location in southwestern France over several years.
Results: Quantitative assessment of performance measures supported qualitative reports from
utility managers. Results indicate significantly reduced duration of low-chlorine events at one
production facility and a significant decrease in customer complaints related to water quality,
manifesting reported improvements in operational performance and the customer service
culture.
Conclusion: The findings demonstrate some success stories and potential areas of future
performance tracking. Cyclical iteration of the WSP can help to achieve continuous quality
improvement. Successfully applied evaluation criteria such as the number of water quality
complaints or alarm resolution time might be useful across other locations.

Version 1
18. October 2017.
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by WHO EURO, 18. October, 2017

Plan de gestion de la sécurité sanitaire de l’eau : un guide pratique pour l’amélioration de la sécurité sanitaire de l’eau potable dans les petites communautés

by WHO EURO, 18. October, 2017

Disposer d’eau potable de qualité acceptable et en suffisance est une condition préalable et essentielle à la bonne santé, au développement économique et à la durabilité des moyens de subsistance des familles des collectivités rurales. La mise en place d’un plan de gestion de la sécurité sanitaire de l’eau constitue l’approche la plus efficace en vue d’assurer l’alimentation en eau potable dans les systèmes d’approvisionnement en eau à petite échelle.

Le guide pratique explique cette approche étape par étape, et présente un ensemble de modèles prêts à l’emploi afin que les personnes ou entités chargées de l’approvisionnement en eau dans les zones rurales puissent élaborer et mettre en œuvre leur propre plan de gestion de la sécurité sanitaire de l’eau.

Le guide pratique s’adresse en particulier aux membres de la communauté rurale responsables de l’exploitation et de la gestion de l’approvisionnement en eau, ainsi qu’au personnel des services locaux de santé et d’approvisionnement en eau chargé de la préservation de la qualité de l’eau potable, et aux organisations non gouvernementales qui veillent à la sécurité sanitaire de l’eau potable dans les collectivités rurales.

Version 1
27. June 2018.
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by Emily Kumpel et al., 10. June, 2018

Measuring the Impacts of Water Safety Plans in the Asia-Pacific Region

by Emily Kumpel et al., 10. June, 2018

This study investigated the effectiveness of Water Safety Plans (WSP) implemented in 99 water supply systems across 12 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. An impact assessment methodology including 36 indicators was developed based on a conceptual framework proposed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and before/after data were collected between November 2014 and June 2016. WSPs were associated with infrastructure improvements at the vast majority (82) of participating sites and to increased financial support at 37 sites. In addition, significant changes were observed in operations and management practices, number of water safety-related meetings, unaccounted-for water, water quality testing activities, and monitoring of consumer satisfaction. However, the study also revealed challenges in the implementation of WSPs, including financial constraints and insufficient capacity. Finally, this study provided an opportunity to test the impact assessment methodology itself, and a series of recommendations are made to improve the approach (indicators, study design, data collection methods) for evaluating WSPs.

Version 1
9. November 2016.
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by Paul M Byleveld et al.,

Safe drinking water in regional NSW, Australia

by Paul M Byleveld et al.,

The New South Wales (NSW) Public Health Act 2010 requires water suppliers to implement a drinking water quality assurance program that addresses the ‘Framework for management of drinking water quality’ in the Australian drinking water guidelines. NSW Health has recognised the importance of a staged implementation of this requirement and the need to support regional water utilities. To date, NSW Health has assisted 74 regional utilities to develop and implement their management systems. The Public Health Act 2010 has increased awareness of drinking water risk management, and offers a systematic process to identify and control risks. This has benefited large utilities, smaller suppliers, and remote and Aboriginal communities. Work is continuing to ensure implementation of the process by private suppliers and water carters.

Version 1
18. September 2018.
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by WHO et al., 18. September, 2018

Strengthening operations & maintenance through water safety planning: A collection of case studies

by WHO et al., 18. September, 2018

This document presents case studies from lower and higher income settings around the world that highlight O&M benefits resulting from WSP implementation. These case studies contribute to a growing body of information on the outcomes of water safety planning and may be useful in building support for WSPs among water sector senior managers, operational staff and other stakeholders.

Version 4
24. August 2016.
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by WHO, 2011

Guidelines for drinking-water quality (4th Ed.) – JAPANESE

by WHO, 2011

The Guidelines for drinking-water quality is an authoritative basis for the setting of national regulations and standards for water safety in support of public health. It provides guidance on ways of implementing its recommendations of contextual hazard identification and risk management, including catchment-to-consumer water safety plans.

Version 1
6. December 2018.
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by Rickert B et al., 30. November, 2018

Climate Resilient Water Safety Plans (CR-WSP). Compilation of potential hazardous events and their causes

by Rickert B et al., 30. November, 2018

Climate-resilient water safety plans (CR-WSPs) extend the traditional WSP framework by also identifying and managing climate-related impacts on water supply systems to strengthen resilience. This compilation of information on hazardous events and their causes, including those related to climate impacts, aims to support practitioners, particularly water suppliers, health agencies and consultants, in implementing CR-WSPs. It is not intended to be an exhaustive list, and may need to be adapted for application in the local context.

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24. May 2018.
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by Karen E. Setty et al., 03. April, 2018

Time series study of weather, water quality, and acute gastroenteritis at Water Safety Plan implementation sites in France and Spain

by Karen E. Setty et al., 03. April, 2018

Water Safety Plans (WSPs), recommended by the World Health Organization since 2004, can help drinking water suppliers to proactively identify potential risks and implement preventive barriers that improve safety. Few studies have investigated long-term impacts of WSPs, such as changes in drinking water quality or public health; however, some evidence from high-income countries associates WSP implementation with a reduction in diarrheal
disease. To validate the previously observed linkages between WSPs and health outcomes, this time series
study examined site-specific relationships between water-related exposures and acute gastroenteritis rates at three locations in France and Spain, including the role of WSP status. Relationships between control or exposure variables and health outcomes were tested using Poisson regression within generalized additive models. Controls included suspected temporal trends in disease reporting. Exposures included temperature, precipitation, raw water quality, and finished water quality (e.g., turbidity, free chlorine). In France, daily acute gastroenteritis cases were tracked using prescription reimbursements; Spanish data aggregated monthly acute gastroenteritis hospital visits. The models identified several significant relationships between indicators of exposure and acute gastroenteritis. Lag times of 6–9 days (including transit time) were most relevant for hydrological indicators (related to precipitation, runoff, and flow) at the two French sites, indicative of viral pathogens. Flush events (defined as surface runoff after a two-week antecedent dry period) linked to nonpoint source pollution were associated with a 10% increase in acute gastroenteritis rates at one location supplied by surface water. Acute gastroenteritis rates were positively associated with elevated turbidity average or maximum values in finished water at locations supplied by both surface and groundwater, by about 4% per 1-NTU increase in the two-week moving average of daily maxima or about 10% per 0.1 NTU increase in the prior month’s average value. In some
cases, risk appeared to be mitigated by WSP-related treatment interventions. Our results suggest drinking water exposure is associated with some potentially preventable gastrointestinal illness risk in high-income regions.

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4. December 2017.
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by World Health Organization (Regional Office for South-East Asia), 17. July, 2017

Principles and Practices of Drinking-water Chlorination: A guide to strengthening chlorination practices in small- to medium-sized water supplies

by World Health Organization (Regional Office for South-East Asia), 17. July, 2017

Practical guidance and training materials for small- and medium-sized water supplies, and for those providing training and support to these suppliers, on strengthening chlorination practices – a common improvement need identified through the WSP process in the South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions. Training materials include a facilitator’s guide and PowerPoint slides, and basic standard operating procedures and calculation sheets for effective and safe chlorination. The materials are based on training programmes delivered in the regions.

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10. February 2017.
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by MOWIE Ethiopia, 18. October, 2016

Climate Change and Health – Ethiopia – Lesson learned documentation WASH sector

by MOWIE Ethiopia, 18. October, 2016

The purpose of this document is to share Ethiopia’s experience in the implementation of the "Building adaptation to climate change in health in least developed countries through WASH project" especially the WASH sector with development partners, government bodies and project implementing member countries. It includes valuable lessons learned from development and implementation of climate-resilient water safety plans and associated policy.